Discussion:
OT Humor: For all you Texicans out there
(too old to reply)
Jim Martin
2003-08-09 18:41:03 UTC
Permalink
“Sweetened ice tea” is appropriate for all meals and you start drinking
Okay, I'm done wiping tears of laughter from eyes so I can type. This whole
thing was funny as hell but the one about tea was way over the top! I can
actually remember the first time I saw a glass of water on a dinner table. I
was 18 and away from my home town. Till then it had always been tea.

Thanks for the laugh,

Jim


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ChairMan
2003-08-09 18:27:48 UTC
Permalink
Don't fergit this either............


Dear Mom:

May 30th: Just moved to Sweetwater, TX. Now this is a city that knows how
to live!! Beautiful sunny days and warm balmy evenings. What a place! I
watched the sunset from the Country Club lying on a blanket. It was
beautiful. I've finally found my home. I love it here.

June 14th: Really heating up. Got to 100 today. Not a problem. Live in an
air-conditioned home, drive an air-conditioned car. What a pleasure to see
the sun everyday like this. I'm turning into a sun worshiper.

June 30th: Had the backyard landscaped with western plants today. Lots of
cactus and rocks. What a breeze to maintain. No more mowing lawn for me.
Another scorcher today, but I love it here.

July 10th: The temperature hasn't been below 100 all week. How do people
get used to this kind of heat? At least it's kind of windy though. But
getting used to the heat is taking longer that I expected.

July 15th: Fell asleep by the pool. (Got 3rd degree burns over 60% of my
body). Missed 3 days of work. What a dumb thing to do. I learned my lesson
though. Got to respect the ol' sun in a climate like this.

July 20th: I missed Morgan (our cat) sneaking into the car when I left
this morning. By the time I got to the hot car for lunch, Morgan had died
and swollen up to the size of a shopping bag and stank up the $2,000
leather upholstery. I told the kids that she ran away. The car now smells
like Kibbles and shits. I learned my lesson though. No more pets in this
heat.

July 25th: The wind sucks. It feels like a giant freaking blow dryer!! And
it's hot as hell. The home air-conditioner is on the fritz and the AC
repairman charged $200 just to drive by and tell me he needed to order
parts.

July 30th: Been sleeping outside by the pool for 3 nights now. $1,500 in
damn house payments and we can't even go inside. Why did I ever come here?

Aug. 4th: It's 115 degrees. Finally got the air-conditioner fixed today.
It cost $500 and gets the temperature down to 85, but the house feel like
it's about 95. Stupid repairman. I hate this stupid city.

Aug. 8th: If another wise ass cracks, "Hot enough for you today?" I'm
going to strangle him. Damn heat. By the time I get to work the radiator
is boiling over, my clothes are soaking wet, and I smell like baked cat!!

Aug. 9th: Tried to run some errands after work. Wore shorts, and sat on
the black leather seats in the ol' car. I thought my ass was on fire. I
lost 2 layers of flesh and all the hair on the back of my legs and ass.
Now my car smells like burnt hair, fried ass, and baked cat.

Aug. 10th: The weather report might as well be a damn recording. Hot and
sunny. Hot and sunny. Hot and sunny. It's been too hot to do shit for 2
damn months and the weatherman says it might really warm up next week.
Doesn't it ever rain in this damn desert? Water rationing will be next, so
my $1700 worth of cactus just might dry up and blow into the damn pool.
Even the cactus can't live in this damn heat.

Aug. 14th: Welcome to HELL!!! Temperature got to 115 today. Forgot to
crack the window and blew the damn windshield out of the car. The
installer came to fix it and said, "Hot enough for you today?" My wife
had to spend the $1500 house payment to bail me out of jail. Freaking
Texas. What kind of a sick demented idiot would want to live here?
PC
2003-08-09 18:29:07 UTC
Permalink
All correct, but those armadillos with four feet in the air are actually
possum on the half-shell. A delicacy in neighboring Louisiana.

Phil
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a few
no one has ever seen before.
Raccoons will test your melon crop and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree. (OBWW)
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
A tractor is NOT an all terrain vehicle. They do get stuck.
The wind blows at 90 mph from Oct 2 till June 25, then it stops totally
until October 2.
Onced and twiced are words.
Coldbeer is one word.
People actually grow and eat okra.
Green grass DOES burn.
When you live in the country you don’t have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first few
weeks.
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it’s time to see a
doctor.
Fixin-to is one word.
A TANK is a dirt hole that holds water for irrigation, watering the
cows, or swimming.
There ain’t no such thing as”lunch”. There is only dinner and then
there’s supper.
“Sweetened ice tea” is appropriate for all meals and you start drinking
it when you are two.
Backwards and forwards means I know everything about you.
“Jeet?” is actually a phrase meaning, “did you eat?”
You don’t have to wear a watch because it doesn’t matter what time it is.
You work until you’re done or it’s too dark to see.
1. You measure distance in minutes.
2. You’ve ever had to switch for “heat” to “A/C” in the same day.
3. Stores don’t have bags, they have sacks.
4. You see a car with the engine running in the Walmart parking lot with
no one in it, no matter what time of the year.
5.You use “fix” as a verb. Example: I am fixin’ to go to the store.
(note: in the portion above “fix-in-to” is one word....)
6 All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
7. You install security lights on your house and garage and leave both
unlocked.
8. You carry jumper cables for your own car.
9. You know what “cow tipping” and “snipe hunting” are.
l0. You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Catsup, and
Tabasco.
11. You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
12. You think sexy underwear is a tee shirt and boxer shorts.
13. The local papers covers national and international news on one page
but requires six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
14. You think that the first day of deer season is a national holiday.
15. You know which leaves make good toilet paper.
16. You find 100 degrees a “tad” warm.
17. You know all four seasons: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
18. You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
19. Going to Walmart is a favorite past-time known as “goin Walmartin’”
or “off to Wally-world”.
20. You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good chili
weather.
21. A carbonated soft drink isn’t a soda, cola, or pop....It’s a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
22. You understand these jokes.
If you do, forward them to your friends from Texas.
Fred Miner
2003-08-10 00:13:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by PC
All correct, but those armadillos with four feet in the air are actually
possum on the half-shell. A delicacy in neighboring Louisiana.
Phil
Armadillos sleep in the middle of the road with all four feet in the air.
There are 5,000 types of snakes and 4,998 live in Texas.
There are 10,000 types of spiders. All 10,000 live in Texas, plus a few
no one has ever seen before.
Raccoons will test your melon crop and let you know when they are ripe.
If it grows, it will stick you. If it crawls, it will bite you!
Nothing will kill a mesquite tree. (OBWW)
There are valid reasons some people put razor wire around their house.
A tractor is NOT an all terrain vehicle. They do get stuck.
The wind blows at 90 mph from Oct 2 till June 25, then it stops totally
until October 2.
Onced and twiced are words.
Coldbeer is one word.
People actually grow and eat okra.
Green grass DOES burn.
When you live in the country you don’t have to buy a dog. City people
drop them off at your front gate in the middle of the night.
The sound of coyotes howling at night only sounds good for the first few
weeks.
When a buzzard sits on the fence and stares at you, it’s time to see a
doctor.
Fixin-to is one word.
A TANK is a dirt hole that holds water for irrigation, watering the
cows, or swimming.
There ain’t no such thing as”lunch”. There is only dinner and then
there’s supper.
“Sweetened ice tea” is appropriate for all meals and you start drinking
it when you are two.
Backwards and forwards means I know everything about you.
“Jeet?” is actually a phrase meaning, “did you eat?”
You don’t have to wear a watch because it doesn’t matter what time it is.
You work until you’re done or it’s too dark to see.
1. You measure distance in minutes.
2. You’ve ever had to switch for “heat” to “A/C” in the same day.
3. Stores don’t have bags, they have sacks.
4. You see a car with the engine running in the Walmart parking lot with
no one in it, no matter what time of the year.
5.You use “fix” as a verb. Example: I am fixin’ to go to the store.
(note: in the portion above “fix-in-to” is one word....)
6 All the festivals across the state are named after a fruit or a
vegetable.
7. You install security lights on your house and garage and leave both
unlocked.
8. You carry jumper cables for your own car.
9. You know what “cow tipping” and “snipe hunting” are.
l0. You only have four spices in your kitchen: Salt, Pepper, Catsup, and
Tabasco.
11. You think everyone from north of Dallas has an accent.
12. You think sexy underwear is a tee shirt and boxer shorts.
13. The local papers covers national and international news on one page
but requires six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
14. You think that the first day of deer season is a national holiday.
15. You know which leaves make good toilet paper.
16. You find 100 degrees a “tad” warm.
17. You know all four seasons: Almost summer, summer, still summer and
Christmas.
18. You know whether another Texan is from East, West, North, or South
Texas as soon as he opens his mouth.
19. Going to Walmart is a favorite past-time known as “goin Walmartin’”
or “off to Wally-world”.
20. You describe the first cool snap (below 70 degrees) as good chili
weather.
21. A carbonated soft drink isn’t a soda, cola, or pop....It’s a Coke
regardless of brand or flavor.
22. You understand these jokes.
If you do, forward them to your friends from Texas.
Hey Bob Wheatley, help us Texans out.

Fred
John-R W
2003-08-09 20:42:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Martin
"Sweetened ice tea" is appropriate for all meals and you start drinking
Okay, I'm done wiping tears of laughter from eyes so I can type. This whole
thing was funny as hell but the one about tea was way over the top! I can
actually remember the first time I saw a glass of water on a dinner table. I
was 18 and away from my home town. Till then it had always been tea.
And it ain't the same if you don't drank it from a fruit-jar...... I never
knew what a store bought glass looked like till I went into the army......
(take that back, I do remember seeing some that my mom got out of Tide
Laundry Soap when she opened up a new box, they actually usta give them
away).
c***@lycos.com
2003-08-09 23:26:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by John-R W
And it ain't the same if you don't drank it from a fruit-jar...... I never
knew what a store bought glass looked like till I went into the army......
(take that back, I do remember seeing some that my mom got out of Tide
Laundry Soap when she opened up a new box, they actually usta give them
away).
You never had jelly glasses iirc?

Wes
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Lycos address is a spam trap.
Jim Stuyck
2003-08-10 00:09:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@lycos.com
Post by John-R W
And it ain't the same if you don't drank it from a fruit-jar...... I never
knew what a store bought glass looked like till I went into the army......
(take that back, I do remember seeing some that my mom got out of Tide
Laundry Soap when she opened up a new box, they actually usta give them
away).
You never had jelly glasses iirc?
I was thinking along similar lines, about all the free
glasses (and steak knives and coffee mugs) we used
to get at the gas stations, back when "regular" was
about 33.9 cents per gallon.

Oh...and being a Texan I'm far from offended by
the post: Much more truth than fiction in it. ;-)

Jim Stuyck
Preston Andreas
2003-08-10 14:36:25 UTC
Permalink
Boy, out of all of Texas, you had to pick the largest, most desolate, and
hottest area. If there is a hell in Texas, that's it. There is nothing
good about that part of Texas. Nothing but thorny brush and oil.

Preston
Post by Jim Stuyck
Oh...and being a Texan I'm far from offended by
the post: Much more truth than fiction in it. ;-)
Jim Stuyck
Only been in Texas once. It was with my brother. We bicycle camped
in April riding from Pecos, to Ft Stockton, Big Bend, Presido,
Ruidosa, Marpha, Lake Balmoria, and back to Peco's.
We met the nicest people along the way. Most sure that we were going
to perish along the way until we convinced them that we has first aid
equipment, shelter, and 2 1/2 gallons of water each with us.
I've never been on a paved road for 32 miles and never saw another
vehicle before. (Exit of ranch road from Ruidosa to Marfa)
Next time, I'm bringing a RV!
Wes.
--
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Lycos address is a spam trap.
Michael Burton
2003-08-10 14:48:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stuyck
Oh...and being a Texan I'm far from offended by
the post: Much more truth than fiction in it. ;-)
Jim Stuyck
Only been in Texas once. It was with my brother. We bicycle camped
in April riding from Pecos, to Ft Stockton, Big Bend, Presido,
Ruidosa, Marpha, Lake Balmoria, and back to Peco's.
We met the nicest people along the way. Most sure that we were going
to perish along the way until we convinced them that we has first aid
equipment, shelter, and 2 1/2 gallons of water each with us.
I've never been on a paved road for 32 miles and never saw another
vehicle before. (Exit of ranch road from Ruidosa to Marfa)
Next time, I'm bringing a RV!
Wes.
That is a pretty good haul on a bictycle. I was born and raised about 40
miles east of Pecos in Monahans. There isn't a whole lot of scenery
between Pecos and Ft. Stockton was there.:-) I know that country well
Swingman
2003-08-10 15:16:38 UTC
Permalink
I lived in Monahans briefly as a kid (Dad was working on a seismograph crew
after the war and before he finished college) ... we went swimming in Ft
Stockton a few times. IIRC correctly, there was a spring there in those days
that folks used to come from miles around to swim in.

Remember cranking an ice cream maker outside by kerosene lantern, while
keeping watch for the tarantulas that were as big a dinner plates coming to
the light.

Further north, the space were so wide open, that if you stared at the
horizon long enough you could see the back of your head.
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Last update: 7/28/03


"Michael Burton" wrote in message
Post by Michael Burton
That is a pretty good haul on a bictycle. I was born and raised about 40
miles east of Pecos in Monahans. There isn't a whole lot of scenery
between Pecos and Ft. Stockton was there.:-) I know that country well
Michael Burton
2003-08-10 19:36:27 UTC
Permalink
That spring is called Commanche Springs. It is just a pond now in the
park. The spring has dried up do to excessive pumping for irrigation
water. One of the finest vinyards and wineries in the country is in Ft.
Stockton. St. Genevive I believe is what it is called.
I remember cranking on those ice crean freezers too. It was hard work
for us kids but it was worth it when the ice cream was ready. :-)

Michael
Post by Swingman
I lived in Monahans briefly as a kid (Dad was working on a seismograph
crew after the war and before he finished college) ... we went
swimming in Ft Stockton a few times. IIRC correctly, there was a
spring there in those days that folks used to come from miles around
to swim in.
Remember cranking an ice cream maker outside by kerosene lantern,
while keeping watch for the tarantulas that were as big a dinner
plates coming to the light.
Further north, the space were so wide open, that if you stared at the
horizon long enough you could see the back of your head.
Swingman
2003-08-10 15:03:45 UTC
Permalink
Reminds me of the line in one of Steve Fromholtz's song: "Come on down to
Texas .... for a while." IOW, you're welcome to visit, but please don't
stay. ... or: "I wasn't born in Texas, but I got here quick as I could".
--
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Last update: 7/28/03



"Jim Stuyck" wrote in message
Glad you came. Y'all come back now. ;-)
Jim Stuyck
Lee Michaels
2003-08-10 21:26:07 UTC
Permalink
I showed this list to some who moved to Texas. She added the following
items.


23. You know that 'watching the streets bubble' isn't just an expression.
24. You know it's done when someone says "Put a fork in it."
25. They block off the streets so that you *can* stumble from bar to bar
with a beer in your hand.
26. Instead of 'out of order', you'll see signs that say 'it don't work' or
'needs fixin'.
Dennis Vogel@patmedia.net
2003-08-11 21:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Stuyck
I was thinking along similar lines, about all the free
glasses (and steak knives and coffee mugs) we used
to get at the gas stations, back when "regular" was
about 33.9 cents per gallon.
You mean fillin' stations, doncha?

Dennis Vogel
Michael Burton
2003-08-10 14:45:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@lycos.com
Post by John-R W
And it ain't the same if you don't drank it from a fruit-jar...... I
never knew what a store bought glass looked like till I went into the
army...... (take that back, I do remember seeing some that my mom got
out of Tide Laundry Soap when she opened up a new box, they actually
usta give them away).
You never had jelly glasses iirc?
Wes
I thought jelly glasses were bought in sets until I saw Momma cleaning the
labels off some one day whenI was a kid. She still has some of them. I was
drinking tea out of one just a couple of weeks ago.
:-)
David Hall
2003-08-10 17:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Burton
I thought jelly glasses were bought in sets until I saw Momma cleaning the
labels off some one day whenI was a kid. She still has some of them. I was
drinking tea out of one just a couple of weeks ago.
:-)
My wife collected a set of Bicentinial jelly glasses when she was 18 in 1976.
We still have them and they are in the "good" china closet arrainged to be seen
through the glass doors. I miss the 1 lb butter bowls that you used to get
your margerine in as late as the late 70's. These were great cereal bowls. My
mother still has and uses them along with her jelly jars and full set of dishes
from Tide ( of course she still has one dress made from floral printed feed
bags from when she was a child in the 1930's in the hills of W. Va.) Somehow we
now think we are "recycling" when we put our pop cans in a separate container
when throwing them away.

Dave Hall
Charlie Self
2003-08-10 18:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Hall
My
mother still has and uses them along with her jelly jars and full set of dishes
from Tide ( of course she still has one dress made from floral printed feed
bags from when she was a child in the 1930's in the hills of W. Va.) Somehow we
now think we are "recycling" when we put our pop cans in a separate container
when throwing them away.
Like someone else earlier, I didn't even know glasses could be bought in sets
until I was at least 16--ours were always jelly jars. We had some dishes my
parents had picked up in theaters in the '30s, when giving away pieces of
dinnerware was common. And my mother probably didn't realize there was any
other kind of dress that didn't start as a flowered feed sack...slightly north
of Charlottesville, VA. Walton's country, really, but as Mom said, there was no
chance on earth an farm family around would have a car per kid in the '20s,
'30s or, really, until about the '80s.

Charlie Self

"We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a *part* of NATO. We have a firm
commitment to Europe. We are a *part* of Europe."
Dan Quayle
Silvan
2003-08-10 23:05:11 UTC
Permalink
from floral printed feed bags from when she was a child in the 1930's in
the hills of W. Va.) Somehow we now think we are "recycling" when we put
our pop cans in a separate container when throwing them away.
My great aunt used to very carefully remove, store, and re-use wrapping
paper.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan <***@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
Confirmed post number: 17136 Approximate word count: 514080
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Ramsey
2003-08-10 23:36:57 UTC
Permalink
Heck, my mother and wife still save ribbons, paper and whatnot. Ther
is a place here in Arkansas (War Eagle Mill?) that still sellls
printed feed bags. They are kinda cool.

On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 19:05:11 -0400, Silvan
Post by Silvan
from floral printed feed bags from when she was a child in the 1930's in
the hills of W. Va.) Somehow we now think we are "recycling" when we put
our pop cans in a separate container when throwing them away.
My great aunt used to very carefully remove, store, and re-use wrapping
paper.
Dick Durbin
2003-08-11 16:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Hall
I miss the 1 lb butter bowls that you used to get
your margerine in as late as the late 70's. These were great cereal bowls.
We still have about a half-dozen of them that we use as cereal bowls.
They must me thirty years old.

Dick Durbin
Preston Andreas
2003-08-09 23:57:07 UTC
Permalink
I'm a born and raised Texan and damned proud of it. I guess what you posted
is funny, but the problem is, I see a whole lot of it as truth. As I looked
through it, I kept murmuring - Yep, that's right. It's really kind of
amazing. Anyway, I'm fixin-to go out to the shop real early tomorrow. It's
been hitting 105° - 108° shortly after lunch (during the week it is lunch;
on Sunday, it's dinner) and although its workable, it is a "tad" warm. I
find myself drinking a lot of Cokes (Dr. Pepper) during the afternoon.

And for you Yankees, meaning anyone north of the Southside of Dallas, this
post isn't OT-Humor, it is a way of life.

Preston
Silvan
2003-08-10 02:34:54 UTC
Permalink
Heck, a lot of those apply to where I live too. (Southwestern Virginia.)
2. You?ve ever had to switch for ?heat? to ?A/C? in the same day.
Yup. Especially this year.
4. You see a car with the engine running in the Walmart parking lot with
no one in it, no matter what time of the year.
Yup.
5.You use ?fix? as a verb. Example: I am fixin? to go to the store.
(note: in the portion above ?fix-in-to? is one word....)
Yup.
9. You know what ?cow tipping? and ?snipe hunting? are.
Yup.
13. The local papers covers national and international news on one page
but requires six pages to cover Friday night high school football.
Yup.
15. You know which leaves make good toilet paper.
Yup. (NOT stinging nettles. DAMHIKT)
--
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Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
Confirmed post number: 17112 Approximate word count: 513360
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charlieb
2003-08-10 05:58:09 UTC
Permalink
You forgot the plague of locust - well actually they're
just grass hoppers - but BIG Texas sized grass hoppers,
in numbers that make waves acrossed a well grazed pasture
as you walk down to the stock tank to go fishin' (and
dodging cottom mouths and rattlers). At least that's
the way it is in Central Texas.

charlie b
Grant P. Beagles
2003-08-11 16:23:49 UTC
Permalink
A tip of the longneck to number 4!!!!
After falling off my chair with laughter, while reading these posts, I
decided to list some reasons why I have spent the last 24 of my 46 years
living out in the Texas country.
1. Gardening is a year round hobby
2. Yes Ma'am and Yes Sir are still taught to kids
3. Jesus is still our number one Hero
4. The women are the prettiest in the country (and the heat just makes them
dress more attractively
Dick Durbin
2003-08-11 16:33:04 UTC
Permalink
9. You know what “cow tipping” and “snipe hunting” are.
Everyone know what snipe hunting is but I think that cow tipping is
something made up by Yankees. The only place I have ever heard of it
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.

Dick Durbin
Charlie Self
2003-08-11 17:43:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dick Durbin
Everyone know what snipe hunting is but I think that cow tipping is
something made up by Yankees. The only place I have ever heard of it
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
College kids. Last I heard of it was around Blacksburg, VA. Not exactly prime
Yankee territory.

Charlie Self

"We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a *part* of NATO. We have a firm
commitment to Europe. We are a *part* of Europe."
Dan Quayle
Swingman
2003-08-11 17:55:00 UTC
Permalink
See number 11, and replace "accent" with "yankee" ...
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Last update: 8/11/03


"Charlie Self" < wrote in message
Post by Charlie Self
Post by Dick Durbin
Everyone know what snipe hunting is but I think that cow tipping is
something made up by Yankees. The only place I have ever heard of it
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
College kids. Last I heard of it was around Blacksburg, VA. Not exactly prime
Yankee territory.
d***@fairfax.com
2003-08-11 18:34:36 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Swingman
See number 11, and replace "accent" with "yankee" ...
HUH? Everybody North of Dallas has a Yankee? Are you reviving the War
of Northern Aggression?
Dave in Fairfax
--
reply-to doesn't work
use:
daveldr at att dot net
Fred Miner
2003-08-11 22:05:11 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Dick Durbin
Everyone know what snipe hunting is but I think that cow tipping is
something made up by Yankees. The only place I have ever heard of it
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
Hell, anybody who knws what a timberdoodle is has probly done some cow
tipping. Come outta the closet and admit.
Dave in Fairfax
I just busted down my closet door and got out but my cows are still
upright. And I always thought Timberdoodles were Woodcocks. They
look like snipes but they don't responed to a gunny sack and a
flashlight.

Fred
Dick Durbin
2003-08-11 22:57:59 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Dick Durbin
Everyone know what snipe hunting is but I think that cow tipping is
something made up by Yankees. The only place I have ever heard of it
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
Hell, anybody who knws what a timberdoodle is has probly done some cow
tipping. Come outta the closet and admit.
Dave in Fairfax
To the best of my recollection a timberdoodle is an effete Yankee name
for a woodcock. No self-respecting son of Dixie would be caught dead
using a term like that; he'd get laughed of the courthouse steps.
d***@fairfax.com
2003-08-12 01:06:19 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Dick Durbin
To the best of my recollection a timberdoodle is an effete Yankee name
for a woodcock. No self-respecting son of Dixie would be caught dead
using a term like that; he'd get laughed of the courthouse steps.
Thanks, first time anybody's ever called me effete, we'll haveta get ya
fitted for glasses, I'm a knuckle dragger. We used snip and tiberdoodle
interchangably, hate to think I was shootin the wrong thing. The tasted
nasty though. Flew like they were drunk.
Dave in Fairfax
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Dick Durbin
2003-08-12 12:11:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by d***@fairfax.com
snip
Post by Dick Durbin
To the best of my recollection a timberdoodle is an effete Yankee name
for a woodcock. No self-respecting son of Dixie would be caught dead
using a term like that; he'd get laughed of the courthouse steps.
Thanks, first time anybody's ever called me effete, we'll haveta get ya
fitted for glasses, I'm a knuckle dragger. We used snip and tiberdoodle
interchangably, hate to think I was shootin the wrong thing. The tasted
nasty though. Flew like they were drunk.
Dave in Fairfax
If you are able to hit those bad boys you must be a helluva shot. I
always had my shotgun tangled up in the briars and branches.
d***@fairfax.com
2003-08-12 17:25:41 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Dick Durbin
If you are able to hit those bad boys you must be a helluva shot. I
always had my shotgun tangled up in the briars and branches.
Took a singleshot Winchester to strange clubs to make cig money against
the locals.
dave in Fairfax
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Silvan
2003-08-12 15:35:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charlie Self
Post by Dick Durbin
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
College kids. Last I heard of it was around Blacksburg, VA. Not exactly
prime Yankee territory.
Funny. I was about to say I've heard of lots of cow tipping in these parts.
Usually bored college kids. (Bored Yankee college kids, and people from
NoVA count as Yankees...)

I live in Christiansburg.
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Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
Confirmed post number: 17165 Approximate word count: 514950
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Charlie Self
2003-08-12 23:24:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Silvan
Post by Charlie Self
Post by Dick Durbin
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
College kids. Last I heard of it was around Blacksburg, VA. Not exactly
prime Yankee territory.
Funny. I was about to say I've heard of lots of cow tipping in these parts.
Usually bored college kids. (Bored Yankee college kids, and people from
NoVA count as Yankees...)
Hope to get out of WV and back to Bedford County soon.

As far as the kids at Tech are concerned, neither you, nor I, know where most
of them come from. For all I know, half are from Georgia and the rest from
Norfolk.

Charlie Self

"We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a *part* of NATO. We have a firm
commitment to Europe. We are a *part* of Europe."
Dan Quayle
solarman
2003-08-13 01:22:57 UTC
Permalink
Now Charlie, you must never ever use the words Georgia and Tech in the same
sentence. It just confuses them. The correct term is "Little North Avenue
Trade School" in case you didn't know. We (UGA) Bulldogs know the
difference and the women here still all have their teeth.

Now I suppose those poor devils from Norfolk must surely be the spawn of
some swabbies out there....
Post by Charlie Self
Post by Silvan
Post by Charlie Self
Post by Dick Durbin
is when city folks try to make fun of country folks.
College kids. Last I heard of it was around Blacksburg, VA. Not exactly
prime Yankee territory.
Funny. I was about to say I've heard of lots of cow tipping in these parts.
Usually bored college kids. (Bored Yankee college kids, and people from
NoVA count as Yankees...)
Hope to get out of WV and back to Bedford County soon.
As far as the kids at Tech are concerned, neither you, nor I, know where most
of them come from. For all I know, half are from Georgia and the rest from
Norfolk.
Charlie Self
"We have a firm commitment to NATO, we are a *part* of NATO. We have a firm
commitment to Europe. We are a *part* of Europe."
Dan Quayle
David Hall
2003-08-13 15:08:51 UTC
Permalink
At least one last year was from Parkersburg, Charlie. He is my nephew and
graduated in the spring.
Parkersburg kid makes good? Actually, most of the youngsters I've met here are
on their way(s) to doing well. But VPU is also one helluva demanding
engineering school (I hear the parties ain't so bad either).
Charlie Self
"The future will be better tomorrow."
Dan Quayle
Funny thing is, he is still looking for a job (and the pickin's are
slim) while my other Parkersburg nephew (on the wife's side) with the
same degree but from WVU is making in the $80s in Northern Va. He
graduated 3 years ago when they were still hiring folks with computer
engineering degrees. ...and I think WVU (my alma mater) is also well
ranked in the party catagory.

Dave Hall
Silvan
2003-08-14 02:10:49 UTC
Permalink
are on their way(s) to doing well. But VPU is also one helluva demanding
engineering school (I hear the parties ain't so bad either).
Feh. During the construction of The Wall, they temporarily ran access to a
frat house via a little service road almost right across the street from my
house.

Damn kids.

When did I grow up anyway? I used to _be_ a college kid. Now I find them
incredibly irritating.

Luckily, that service road is on the other side of The Wall, so I don't have
to worry about them anymore. We just have one kid in the neighborhood. I
guess every neighborhood has one. The little asshole who takes the 15 mph
corner at 45 mph and then gets all the way up to 5th gear just in time to
rub most of his tread off just before the stop sign....

Little bastard almost ran over one of my kids. I should get me some
Quickrete and make me a speed bump. Then maybe I can see how fast he
drives without an oil pan.

Damn kids. <shakes fist>
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Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
Confirmed post number: 17184 Approximate word count: 515520
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Charlie Self
2003-08-14 08:47:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charlie Self
As far as the kids at Tech are concerned, neither you, nor I, know where
most of them come from. For all I know, half are from Georgia and the rest
from Norfolk.
I doubt if half are from Georgia. I'd say half are from NoVA and the rest
are from India. :)
Dunno. I stay away from most college kids, just as I did when I was in college.

Charlie Self

"The future will be better tomorrow."
Dan Quayle

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